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Often times CNC programming tutorials only teach you how to create the tool-paths and not enough attention is paid on showing how to properly hold parts being machined.

At the same time efficient workholding is an art in it self and mastering it could drastically improve shop productivity and accuracy.

Without further ado let's jump into the workflow.

Step 1. Analyze the Drawing and the Model

We would have to look at the drawing, tolerances and the CAD model to develop the machining strategy.

This particular part has tight (+/- 0.001) tolerances between the features located on the top and the bottom sides. In addition to that it has a 2.5 degree draft angle on external walls.

Thus I decided to not use the soft jaws approach and machine it in a fixture. Soft jaws are generally OK for tolerances down to +/-0.001" but because of the draft angle the part would always want to pop out of the jaws.

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Before we start milling away our stock we first need to get down to the required depth.

This is not a problem with external features when we can plunge outside.

When machining closed pockets, however, we need to find a way to get down to the machining depth first.

As usual there are several ways to get the job done. The plunging methods listed here are not ordered by their preference.

For various machining operations on different materials some may be more preferable than others.

Straight Plunging into a larger Pre-Drilled hole

This is one the best ones in my opinion.
Very few machining modes can compete in effectiveness with drilling and this method will get you the best combined tool life on most materials and (in case of many deep pockets) the least machining time, even when tool change time is factored in.

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True 5 Axis Machining

September 1, 2016, 7:50 pm

Just saw this very impressive machining video on Practical Machinist forums.

A very nice example of using machine and the tools to their full potential.

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Expanding Mandrel with Outside Support

February 27, 2016, 1:21 pm

Being a CNC Machinist/Programmer is sometimes more than simply creating a program and machining the actual part, often times it is about creating efficient and accurate fixturing.

In this little project:

I had to machine rectangular cut-outs and drill holes through an already-turned steel ring. Then I had to part each ring to 4 equal pieces.

There were about 100 such rings that worked out to 400 pieces in total.

After drilling holes on an indexer I had to machine a fixture to hold my part through 2 remaining set-ups.

First half of the fixture consists of the expanding mandrel:

The work-piece would be mounted on it like so. A hole on the side is used to properly position it:

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Attached file: 14565935071203.jpg

Turner - Modeler

February 27, 2016, 12:06 pm

Being a professional CNC Machinist myself with a good manual background I often find myself watching various machining videos and blogs.

Unlike others I do not often share somebody-else's work, I could just not walk past this one and not tell everybody how great I think this is....

This story was posted on "Russian reddit" and here is the direct translation of the author's post:

Quote:
We have a mechanic/installer at our work. He used to be a lathe machinist on a previous job and had a hobby - created a model copy of KrAZ-255B military truck. Right now he does not have time to work on it but is planning to return to it once he has more time on his hands.

Here is the mid-way result of his....art!

Lets begin with tyres. Vladimir (guy's name) decided to create the mould to make the rubber tyres himself. Here it is:

Here are the tyres he made with it. Beautiful aren't they?

He also made little differentials. Housings, gears. Everything made himself:

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Attached file: 1454507024165677667.jpg

Lately there have been a lot of really interesting HSM topics on PracticalMachinist forums.

In one of them a guy who owns his own resharpening business posted a video of his endmill milling a block of D2 hardened to over 60 RC.
The forum topic is located here First try on D2 62Rc(video)

Here is his post so you know what we are talking about:

Quote:
In an effort to perfect our speeds and feeds while hardmilling, this is the first try. Its not right yet, but far from a failure. I apologize for the language at the end, but I do not edit my videos. The endmill was a reground garr VRX at .353 diameter. Parameters were 750 sfm, .018 radial, .300 axial and .004 ipt.
The next run will be at 650 sfm, .006 ipt using a mist sprayer. Also, any small areas will be blocked off to be ran at lower speeds to allow cooling time for the cutter. Just a note for anyone using a Mag Fadal, The E-stop button is not quick enough, use feed hold. The endmill was badly worn on the corners, but not broken, and will be resharpened and used again.

In the ensuing discussion i posted my own take on how and why HSM works

Quote:
HSM works in many ways.

1) Reduced cutting time per edge per revolution allows it to cool down more.
2) Chip thinning allows to increase chipload (advancement per tooth per revolution)
3) Increased depth of cut combined with shallow radial positively affects deflection. Tool bends less as it is more rigid towards the tool holder.
4) Higher cutting speed actually reduces cutting forces as heat generated in the cutting zone makes it easier to shear off a layer of metal. Yet because the time of contact is so small, most of the heat is carried away with the chip.
5) Higher RPM also allows to get rid of hot chips faster thus further reducing heat transferred to the tool.
6) Higher feedrate actually reduces relative cutting speed.
7) At high axial engagements more than one flute is in contact with the workpiece at different points along the axis of the tool. This too helps combat vibrations and chatter.
8) You are using more of the tool than just its tip, so technically you can do more work with one tool before it gets dull.
9) lastly it looks cool as hell and is very impressive. Whenever we know visitors or bosses are coming we try to make sure some HSM is going on even if application does not merit that
I am not sure if the air that is moved by the endmill is doing much, but i suspect he didn't mean exactly that.

 

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Pictures of Nested Parts

December 9, 2012, 5:10 pm

Here are some samples of nested parts i did recently

In both cases back of all pieces were machined at the same time, dowel holes milled so that there would be a way to align top and bottom.

Ealot of material was lost, but it was a scrap anyways, so all i gained was alot of saved man-hours.

Photobucket

And here are 4 more pictures:

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